Incoming Tide, Minas Basin

May 06, 2012

Incoming tide

The great Minas Basin forms the eastern part of the Bay of Fundy and is its most dynamic region. Here you'll find the highest recorded tides in the world and an isolated, yet productive marine world of zooplankton, clams and the burrowing anthropod, Corophium volutator. The later attracts thousands of semipalmated sandpipers in late summer that loop, dive and skirt along the mudflats in perfect unison. The tides and turbulent currents wear away the soft, red rocks that enclose the basin providing a constant influx of fine silt and sand that is suspended in the swirling seawater.  A place of folklore and visual fascination, the basin is among my favorite places to photograph. There is something about the quality and depth of light and the soft earthy colors that remind me of Northern New Mexico. 

Dykes at Wolfville

Here I'm overlooking vast mudflats from the dykes at Wolfville.

Sandpipers

Sandpipers at Blomidon, skating across the incoming tide

 


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